A brief primer on Federalism

Federalism was an experiment which in some ways has failed. In some areas we have been blessed enough to have a system to adapt and grow into a more mature Country while in other areas we have failed to avoid the fears of the anti-federalists.

Evolutional thinking has seeped into all areas of study including Political Philosophy and History. This has given modern man the impression that all areas of life naturally evolve, that they become better and leave off unnecessary and useless aspects while improving.  In reality all things left behind are not better left off there.

The Supreme Court should not be considered the final voice for all time on the Constitutionality of laws and legislation because that power is shared equally by all three branches in different ways. The Supreme Court has become more powerful than originally intended, it is unchecked, it legislates from the bench; recasting the Constitution in terms beneficial to a large central power. I do not refer to  all Federal Judges at all times, but there is a prevalent awe in modern American culture for black robed men with seemingly vast amounts of good intention, impartiality and wisdom. Continue reading “A brief primer on Federalism”

The Holy Spirit and Superman

There she is, a mom of 3. One child is feverish, another is painting on the wall and there is still laundry and dinner to get to. How is one woman going to maintain composure and deal with all these problems simultaneously? Who has the strength and patience?

Meanwhile, a man sits at his desk at work. There is a lot to do before he can go home and time is running out. He knows his wife must be going through a lot at the moment, but there are reports to finish and he can’t remember if he sent the car payment and what about his good friend who is having marriage problems? There seems to be too much for one man to worry about; too much for one man to carry all by himself. Continue reading “The Holy Spirit and Superman”

How Evil Changes Everything

Why is an otherwise good world, so often full of joy, beauty and gladness, marred by events with no meaningful upside? Like the holocaust, rape, measles, still born birth, cancer, divorce, death?  Is God really all good or is He just inept? What is evil?

Evil does not exist out there in the world (like trees) as a created being or force. It exists at the tips of our fingers and in our words, as extensions of our hearts. Evil is not impersonal. Evil only exists in a community. Evil is depriving someone of something, like their will, their purse or their purity for the fulfillment of self-gratification. Evil is harming someone else for the fulfillment of self-gratification, like rape, murder or physical violence of any kind. Continue reading “How Evil Changes Everything”

Responses to Newtown

A few works that have helped me think through my grief over this horrible sin.

Pastor Doug Wilson: http://www.dougwils.com/Church-Year/and-slew-the-little-childer.html

Pastor Toby Sumptor:  http://www.tobyjsumpter.com/the-newtown-inside-all-of-us/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HavingTwoLegs+%28Having+Two+Legs%29&utm_content=FaceBook

Important Article by Mr. Fund: http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/335739/facts-about-mass-shootings-john-fund#

How the Federal Government became Lord of the States

The foremost reason to deny that the Bill of Rights applies to the States via the Fourteenth Amendment is because it contradicts a fundamental aspect of the Constitution. The Supremacy Clause “does not allocate power between the national and state governments” (ed. Meese, 291). Thus the Federal government does not supersede State governments, except where State governments have given up specific rights for the mutual benefit of covenanted governance. Furthermore, “the Supremacy clause was a straight forward conflict-of-laws rule designed to resolve conflicts between state and federal law touching the same area” (ed. Meese, 291). In regards to mutual jurisdiction, the federal laws are only to supersede within the scope of their limited powers, outlined in the Constitution. The Tenth Amendment reserves the rights not enumerated, to the people or the states. There is no provision for the Judiciary or any other Federal Branch to determine or enforce rights not expressly mentioned in the Constitution. This gave the States autonomy in certain areas where federal law was not permitted to tread. This concept is of course anathema in modern mainstream political thought.  The Bill of Rights was meant to apply to and restrict the Federal Government, not the States. The Fourteenth Amendment was not intended to incorporate the Bill of Rights; neither explicitly in its wording or by the will of the majority of the members of Congress or the State houses who voted for it, as stated by Justice Miller in 1872, in his Slaughterhouse opinion. The incorporation interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment would substantially alter the relationship of the Federal and State governments, which alone disproved incorporation, in Justice Miller’s assessment. Continue reading “How the Federal Government became Lord of the States”